Fluent Reading

Fluency is essential for comprehension and enjoyment of reading. It is important to ensure that practices for building fluency are effective with all students, including those who need guided practice with feedback.

Help students to become fluent readers

 

Fluent Reading

Big Ideas in Beginning Reading: University of Oregon

This lucid outline of the research findings, teaching and assessment of fluency establishes its importance to effort, motivation and comprehension.

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A Closer Look at the Five Essential Components of Effective Reading Instruction: A Review of Scientifically Based Reading Research for Teachers (Learning Point Associates 2004)

Fluency is one of the “five pillars” of reading established by the National Reading Panel. This summary of the research of the NRP includes discussion of fluency in the context of the other “pillars”.

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Using Precision Teaching to Increase the Fluency of Word Reading with Problem Readers (Hughes C, Beverley M and Whitehead J 2007): European Journal of Behavior Analysis 8(2) 221-238
This experimental study compared the progress of five ‘problem readers’ assigned to a fluency building intervention for word reading, with other students who received their usual reading instruction. The article begins with a thorough explanation of the theoretical and applied research bases of Precision Teaching and goes on to outline the effectiveness of the treatment with very little cost in terms of time or resources.
 
 
 
Improving Reading Rate of Low Performers (Engelmann, S undated) Retrieved from zigsite.com

A master class in how to adjust instruction to the needs of the learner.

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Literacy Assessment Based Upon the National Reading Panel’s Big Five Components (Hempenstall, K 2013)

Kerry Hempenstall provides detailed, thorough commentary on research and issues surrounding the effective assessment of the “big five” reading components, including the importance of fluency. 

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Effective Instruction for Adolescent Struggling Readers: A practice brief (Boardman A G, Roberts, G, Vaughn S, Wexler J, Murray C S and Kosanovich M 2008): Center on Instruction

This practice brief includes discussion of how fluency problems contribute to the difficulties of students who reach adolescence, and what can be done about them. Because so many “learning problems” are actually fluency problems, it is essential for teachers to understand how to identify and address these needs.

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Timed Repeated Readings (Reading Rockets)
A short practical summary of how fluency can be built using timed repeated readings. This strategy is low-cost in terms of time and money and is relatively simple to implement. There is a useful summary of the research base for the practice.

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Research for Teachers: #14 Promoting Curriculum Access in Children and Youth with Reading Disabilities (Martinussen, R, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, undated): Elementary Teachers Federation of Ontario

This article argues that targeting fluency is a key priority when addressing the learning needs of older students. 

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Drop Everything and Read – But How? For Students Who Are Not Yet Fluent, Silent Reading Is Not the Best Use of Classroom Time (Hasbrouck, J 2006): American Educator

This article questions the value in "sustained silent reading" (SSR) or "drop everything and read" (DEAR) programmes, particularly for students who struggle with basic reading skills. 

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Help students to become fluent readers